bonæ litteræ: occasional writing from David Rundle, Renaissance scholar

New set of links: Latin humanist texts

Posted in Humanism by bonaelitterae on 28 September, 2008

If you scroll right down to the bottom of the screen, you will see on the right-hand side a short set of links. I am building up a list of humanist (mainly quattrocento) texts available on-line and this is the first step.

There are some useful sites which act as gateways or collect together relevant texts. I have found especially useful the Society for Neo-Latin Studies webpages, and the neo-Latin section of The Latin Library. The texts I have cited come partly thanks to their assistance and partly through wider trawling. They are hosted on a range of websites and appear in a range of formats: some are html texts, others are as images of printed books (either early modern or later), one is a transcription with a link to images of a relevant manuscript. They differ in elegance – the text of Carbone’s funeral oration on Guarino is a sad specimen: it is taken from Garin’s indispensable Prosatori latini, and appears with ragged ends of each line, reflecting the line-ends in the printed text. The quality of the edition also varies.

What particularly strikes me, however, is the paucity of texts available on-line, and the curious nature of what does appear. It might be said that the web of the new millennium need not have any space for a dead language but the democracy of the on-line universe is a Babel of idioms, including the lingua franca of Old Europe (I particularly like the Finnish Latin news station). The Latin of the quattrocento humanists, of course, could be accused of being neither one thing nor the other: not given to the freedom of medieval Latin, at the same time, it does not meet the standards expected of neo-Latin. That said, neo-Latinists are a tolerant bunch and do mention fifeenth-century texts in the on-line resources they are compiling. Whatever the reasons for the relatively low number of texts – at a time when the I Tatti Library series is making many works accessible in hard-copy – what is most striking is the curious nature of what is available.

Often, the texts which can be viewed are not the major works by that author. The best example of this is Leonardo Bruni, the pre-eminent Florentine humanist of the early quattrocento. His De Studiis, as you can see, is available — a relatively minor work but one in which there is modern scholarly interest. Apart from that, Biblioteca Italiana provides a copy of his short tract on whether all Romans spoke Latin which though it may be of interest could hardly be called a work through which he made his reputation. If we wanted to read a work which was  seminal to his intellectual formation, we would want to see his Dialogi ad Petrum Paulum Histrum or his Laudatio Florentinae Urbis. Neither is available, and with the latter of these there is a particular irony. The Laudatio, his praise of Florence which has become a foundation text of civic humanism, was a best-seller in his own lifetime and one of the works for which he was best known — but, after his death, in the age of new-fangled print, it was somehow forgotten and not edited until the twentieth century, by Hans Baron. So, as one medium gave way to another, this small but significant work lost its leading status. Is this happening again? Is the dictum that history repeats itself being proven true?

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2 Responses

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  1. Paul F. Gehl said, on 13 January, 2009 at 4:07 pm

    Thanks for providing these links. I am currently preparing a talk about scholarly publishing on line and have encountered the same phenomenon you note here — that although the number of historical and literary texts on line is immense, there is very little from the Latin fifteenth century (and almost as little from the sixteenth). I am doing some trolling, however, and will let you know if I find useful sites beyond what you have here.

    Paul Gehl
    The Newberry Library, Chicago

  2. bonaelitterae said, on 13 January, 2009 at 4:47 pm

    Thank you for your comment — and I’m very interested to hear of your on-line book. Your message is timely because I have been thinking of augmenting and refining the list. It strikes me that it includes a variety of different types of sites and that there needs to be a protocol about who to cite them, distinguishing between those types. I will, I hope, soon being transferring the information in a new format to a page here. In the meantime, you might be interested into my foray into the fourteenth century: note the pages of two of the three tre corone, to which Petrarch will be added shortly. The contrast in their on-line fortunae is instructive and corroborates the point we have both made.


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